How Does Va Vocational Rehab Work? (Solution found)

A Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) works with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists. After an entitlement decision is made, the Veteran and VRC work together to develop a rehabilitation plan. The rehabilitation plan outlines the rehabilitation services to be provided.

  • Vocational Rehabilitation, once the individual has been found eligible, starts with the evaluation of the individual. The rehabilitation counselor works closely with the service member or veteran to identify his or her: present level of skill, various interests, job goals and personal questions.

Contents

What does VA Vocational Rehabilitation pay for?

Vocational Rehabilitation (Chapter 31) provides assistance to veterans who have a service-connected disability of at least 10 percent and are in need of vocational rehabilitation. Vocational rehab covers a student’s tuition and fees, books, school supplies and also pays a monthly housing allowance.

How long does it take to get approved for VA vocational rehab?

How long does this take? Assuming that a rating has been made on your service-connected disability, you should receive an appointment within 30 days of your application. You should receive a decision concerning entitlement within two months of your first appointment.

How do you get approved for VA Vocational Rehabilitation?

The quickest way is to apply online at the eBenefits website and click on Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment. You may also submit a completed application (VAF 28-1900) at the local VA Regional or outbased office, or mail the completed application to the closest Regional Office.

How long does VA voc rehab last?

Length of a Rehabilitation Program Depending on the length of program needed, Veterans may be provided up to 48 months of full-time services or the part- time equivalent. Rehabilitation plans that only provide services to improve independence in daily living are limited to 30 months.

How long can you use voc rehab?

Services generally last up to 48 months, but they can be extended in certain instances.

Does VA Voc Rehab pay for online classes?

VA will only pay for classes that are applicable to your degree program. VA will only pay for remedial or developmental classes that are taken completely inside the classroom. VA considers hybrid and self-paced classes as online learning. If you choose 100% online and hybrid classes, your MHA will be greatly reduced.

Can you work while using voc rehab?

Truth – Over 42 percent of all disabled veterans using VR&E services are employed at the time of admittance. Thirty- five percent hold jobs throughout the period of retraining. Of those, over half of them felt their current job was in line with their military and/or civilian training.

Can I use voc rehab and GI Bill?

The level of benefits provided may also not be equivalent to your GI Bill. And before you ask, you cannot use your GI Bill and voc rehab benefits simultaneously. You can, however, use both for the same degree. For example, if you pursue a two-year MBA, you may use Chapter 31 Benefits your first year.

Does Voc Rehab back pay?

Previously, most Voc Rehab Counselors would only reimburse disabled veterans for out of pocket training expenses incurred to complete incorrectly disapproved training for up to one year after payment. Now, veterans can apply for Retroactive Inducation all the way back to when they would have qualified for the benefit.

Does VA Voc Rehab pay for flight school?

Congress does allow disabled veterans on Voc Rehab complete flight school so long as it is a part of a degree program. However, Voc Rehab has and does approve commercial flight training.

Does Voc Rehab affect VA disability?

Generally, any kind of employment or use of Voc Rehab for training will not result in a disability rating reduction.

Does Voc Rehab pay law school?

Here is an oldie but a goodie, “Does Vocational Rehab pay for law school?” The answer is, “yes” and “no.” The short answer is, Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment will pay for law school some of the time.

Eligibility for Veteran Readiness and Employment

Read on to learn more about the eligibility requirements for Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR E), which was previously known as Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment. In the event that you are a service member or Veteran who has a disability that was caused—or worsened—by your active-duty service and that limits your ability to work or prevents you from working, you may be eligible for employment support or services to assist you in maintaining as much independence as possible.

If I’m a Veteran, am I eligible for Veteran Readiness and Employment?

In order to be eligible to apply for VR E benefits and services, you must meet both of the following criteria: All of the following conditions must be met:

  • There was no dishonorable discharge given to you
  • You have a service-connected disability rating from the VA of at least 10%
  • And you are still employed.

Your initial evaluation with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will be scheduled once your VR E application has been received and processed by our office (VRC). It is up to the VRC to assess whether or not you are eligible to receive VR E benefits and services. If you were dismissed from active duty before January 1, 2013, your basic period of eligibility expires 12 years after any of the following dates, whichever is later: whichever is later:

  • It is the date on which you were informed of your separation from active duty, or the date on which you were awarded your first VA service-connected disability rating.

If a VRC determines that you have a substantial job impediment, the basic period of eligibility may be extended for a period of time (SEH). Being classified as having a SEH indicates that your service-connected handicap severely impairs your ability to prepare for, get, and retain adequate work (i.e., a job that does not exacerbate your condition, is stable, and corresponds to your talents, aptitudes, and interests). In the event that you were dismissed from active duty on or after January 1, 2013, you are no longer subject to the 12-year basic period of eligibility.

If I’m still on active duty, am I eligible for Veteran Readiness and Employment?

In the event that you are a service member and fulfill at least one of the qualifications listed below, you may be eligible for VR E benefits and services. At least one of the following conditions must be met:

  • The following scenarios apply: You have a pre-discharge disability rating (memorandum rating) of 20 percent or higher and will be leaving the military shortly, or
  • You are waiting to be dismissed because of a serious sickness or injury that happened while you were on active service

Learn more about obtaining VR E services through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES) by visiting their website (IDES) Note:Severely injured active-duty military personnel may be eligible for VR E compensation even before the VA assigns a disability rating for their injuries. According to Section 1631(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act, this is the case (PL 110-181). Deliveries at Discharge (BDD) are a set of benefits that include: In the event that you suffer from a sickness or injury that you feel was caused—or worsened—by your active-duty service, you can make a claim for disability payments under the BDD program 180 to 90 days before you are scheduled to leave the military service.

Find out more about BDD and what to do if you have less than 90 days left on active duty in this article.

More information about VR E benefits and services

  • Investigate the VR E support and services tracks for assistance in acquiring new skills, finding a new career, starting a company, receiving educational counseling, or returning to your previous work.

How to apply for Veteran Readiness and Employment

  • Learn how to apply for Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits and services as a service member or veteran.

Dependent family members

  • Determine if you are entitled for certain counseling, training, and education benefits if you are the dependant family member of a service member or Veteran who has a service-connected disability
  • And

Using VA Voc Rehab for School (The Basics)

Reading time is estimated to be 6 minutes. Reading time is estimated to be 6 minutes. Your GI Bill is not the only option available to you for financing your higher education. Fortunately, under Chapter 31 (Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment), you are now eligible to receive benefits to help pay for your educational expenses while you are working. Your eligibility is determined by two factors: first, whether or not you have a service-connected disability rating of at least 10% (“severe” employment handicap); and second, whether or not you have a service-connected disability rating of at least 10% (“serious” employment handicap).

It’s possible that this procedure will be buried in obscurity, as is the case with many things at the VA. However, I can promise you (based on my own personal experience) that it is a rather simple procedure.

What is the purpose of VA VOC Rehab?

Life in the military may be quite taxing on your mental and physical health. It is possible that you may leave service with lasting physical and/or mental disorders that will make it difficult for you to get career prospects. The VA Voc rehab program is meant to assist you in returning to the workforce. Job training, specific employment accommodations, résumé assistance, and job-seeking counseling are all included in this package. It can also aid you in starting your own business or in providing independent living services to handicapped veterans who are unable to obtain employment opportunities.

How do you Apply for Benefits?

To begin, go toEbenefitsand submit a request for the VA to assess your eligibility. The VA will then review your request. This was quite simple and just took a couple of minutes to do. If you are qualified, a counselor will call you to schedule a meeting so that you may discuss and decide on your benefits. When you apply for a VA benefit online, unlike most other government programs, your decision of eligibility will not be made automatically. Rather, a counselor will need to talk with you and assess your profile before they can proceed.

What will the VA Look at to Determine Eligibility?

Following the submission of your application, the VA will contact you to determine whether you are eligible to meet with a counselor. After that, you’ll need to fill out a number of forms that detail your work history and military experience. In addition, you will be required to complete a career assessment and submit a resume and/or college transcripts to the employer. This information will assist your counselor in developing a more accurate picture of your capabilities. Your counselor will consider a variety of elements in order to determine which career skills you can transfer to the civilian workplace after serving in the military.

  1. A higher percentage of those who joined the military straight out of school and worked in a military-related field (e.g.
  2. Also taken into consideration will be the nature of your individual disability and whether or not they will prevent you from entering the civilian employment.
  3. In addition, the counselor will take into consideration your military service history.
  4. Even if you don’t have hard skills, they may consider soft skills such as leadership or problem-solving when developing your strategy.
  5. Just be honest with them and let them know how you’re feeling about things.
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What Exactly can you get?

This is a jumbled mess. In contrast to the GI Bill, which has a fixed quantity of benefits, VA voc rehab benefits are far more flexible. Following your initial visit with your counselor, you will begin collaborating with them on a plan. Inform them of your intentions and the route you intend to take to get there. Together, you and your counselor will devise a plan for putting this plan into action and determining how to pay for it.

It is impossible to provide an exact figure for how much the VA will pay for vocational rehabilitation. It is important to note, however, that it may be utilized to cover programs such as an MBA or a law degree.

Should you use Your GI Bill (Chapter 33) or VA VOC Rehab Benefits to pay for School?

The answer is not as clear as you may expect. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is far more transferable than Chapter 31 benefits. You are nearly certain to get reimbursement from your GI Bill if you are enrolled in a recognized college and possess a certificate of eligibility (COE). For logical reasons, VA vocational rehabilitation is a little more restricted. The GI Bill is an entitlement that you acquired as a result of your military service. Yours to use as you like for the next chapter of your life or to further your study in the finest institutions.

VA Voc Rehab for School

In contrast, vocational rehabilitation respects the physical and emotional problems that military service brings with it. Vocational rehabilitation, in contrast to the GI Bill, which is awarded to you, is an aid program with a separate set of restrictions and requirements. It is possible that your selected school will not qualify for the intended rewards. It is also possible that the level of benefits granted will not be comparable to your GI Bill. In fact, according to the VA’s website, the subsistence rate for the GI Bill is greater in the majority of circumstances.

  • You may, however, employ both at the same time to the same degree.
  • After then, you will be able to enjoy Chapter 33 benefits for the remainder of the second year.
  • A solid test preparation program may make a significant difference in your ability to get into a good institution.
  • After my initial try at the GRE, a number of experts informed me that I had little chance of being admitted to Darden School of Business (where I currently am).
  • It turned out to be one of the finest buys I’ve ever made.
  • Study Smarter, Get a Better Score with The Princeton Review®.

Final Thoughts

For now, the best suggestion I can provide you is to first file for Chapter 31 benefits if you are eligible for them. It is preferable to have both your benefits and the GI Bill so that you can determine which is the greatest option in the end. You could find it advantageous to pursue a second graduate degree or some other sort of education. If you are eligible for the benefit, you should consult with the VA and your school to establish your best options for obtaining these resources. If you believe you are eligible for vocational rehabilitation, go ahead and submit an application.

It is possible that you will determine that using the GI Bill is the best option for you in the end.

Related: Making a VA claim does not imply that you are a weak person.

The Yellow Ribbon Program and the Top MBA Schools are two examples of this. Columbia Business School offers a military-to-MBA program. This post includes affiliate links for your convenience. Your purchase helps to ensure that The Veteran Professional is available to other veterans in the future.

Veterans Readiness (Vocational Rehabilitation) and Employment

The Veterans Readiness and Employment Program (previously known as the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program), also known as VR E, Chapter 31, or Voc-Rehab, is a federally funded program that assists veterans with service-connected disabilities and employment handicaps in preparing for, finding, and maintaining suitable employment. Veterans with service-connected impairments who are so severe that they are unable to work immediately can take advantage of programs designed to help them live as independently as they possibly can in the community.

  • Ability, skills, interests, and requirements are all assessed in a comprehensive rehabilitation examination. Vocational counseling and rehabilitation planning are two important services. Employability services, such as job-seeking skills development, resume writing, and other work preparation support
  • Employment assistance, including the use of special employer incentives, in finding and keeping a job
  • Occupational training (OJT), apprenticeships, and unpaid work experiences are all examples of on-the-job training. Grants or loans to help pay for post-secondary education at a college, vocational, technical or business school
  • Rehabilitation services that are supportive in nature, such as case management, counseling, and referral Services for people with disabilities

VR E Eligibility

The terms “eligibility” and “entitlement” are not synonymous. Despite the fact that you may be qualified for VR E as a result of a service-connected disability rating, you may not be eligible for any services. The first stage in the VR E procedure is to be reviewed in order to identify whether or not you are eligible for assistance. A veteran must meet the following “eligibility” requirements in order to be considered for VA E services:

  • Have obtained, or will receive, a discharge that is not considered disgraceful in nature. Be classified as having at least a ten percent service-connected disability rating

VR E Program/Process Overview

If the Department of Veterans Affairs concludes that you have an employment handicap as a consequence of a service-connected disability, you will be eligible for benefits. Following that, you and the VRC will continue counseling in order to pick a track of services and collaboratively construct a strategy to address your rehabilitation and job requirements. An job or independent living objective, as well as intermediate targets, will be included in the rehabilitation plan, which will also define the services and resources that will be required to attain these goals.

Even if the VRC concludes that you are ineligible for services, they will assist you in locating other resources to fulfill any rehabilitation and employment requirements that were found throughout the review process.

If you suspect that you may be qualified for VR E services, you may begin the process right away by submitting an online application.

Period of Eligibility

VR E, like many other VA benefits, has a time limit on when it is available. VA service-connected disability ratings are granted for a period of 12 years from the date of discharge from active duty or the date the veteran was first notified by the VA of a service-connected disability rating, whichever is later. If a Veteran Readiness Counselor (VRC) determines that a serious employment handicap exists, the basic period of eligibility may be extended.

VR E Entitlement Details

Your appointment with a VRC for a full examination will be set once your eligibility has been determined. This evaluation will determine whether or not you qualify for Veterans Readiness and Employment programs. The following items are included in this entitlement evaluation:

  • An evaluation of your own interests, aptitudes, and talents
  • In this examination, you will be asked whether service-connected limitations hinder your ability to find and/or maintain employment utilizing the occupational skills you have previously acquired Exploration of potential career paths and formulation of career objectives

After determining that you qualify for benefits, your counselor will work with you to complete the following tasks:

  • Choose a VR E program track that will help you achieve your work or independent living goals. • Determine whether there are potential work or independent living services choices
  • • Determine transferrable skills
  • Investigate the labor market and pay facts
  • And Determine the physical needs and other aspects of the profession
  • Identify a specific employment goal by narrowing down your vocational options. Examine the need for additional training. Determine the resources that will be required to achieve rehabilitation
  • To achieve the identified employment or independent living goal, an individualized rehabilitation plan must be developed

VR E Rehabilitation Plan Details

A rehabilitation plan is a written summary of the services, resources, and criteria that will be used to accomplish effective rehabilitation that is tailored to the individual’s needs. It is a written agreement that is signed by both the veteran and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, and it is evaluated on an annual basis to see whether any modifications are necessary. Depending on your circumstances, you will collaborate with the VRC to pick one of the Five Tracks of services, which are as follows:

  • Reemployment with a former employer
  • Rapid employment services for new employment
  • Self-work
  • Employment through long-term services
  • And services for independent living.

Implementing the VR E Rehabilitation Plan

After a plan has been established and signed, your VRC will continue to collaborate with you in order to put the plan into action in order to get acceptable job or independent living opportunities. Services such as tutorial assistance, job-seeking skills training, medical and dental referrals, adjustment counseling, payment of training allowance (if applicable), and other services may be coordinated by the VRC or case manager to help the client reach his or her rehabilitation goals.

Subsistence Allowance

During your time in training with VR E, you may also be eligible for a monthly subsistence allowance, in addition to earning a monthly paycheck. While in training, this is paid out each month according on the rate of attendance (full-time or part-time), the number of dependents, and the sort of training you are undergoing. According to this scheme, an attending student with two dependents might get up to $980.49 per month as a full-time salary. View the current Subsistence Allowance Rates for VR E employees.

Keep Up With Your Education Benefits

Whether you’re looking for information on how to use your GI Bill, want to learn more about tuition aid and scholarships, or want to learn more about education benefits available to you and your family, Military.com can assist you. Subscribe to Military.com to receive education tips and benefit information delivered straight to your inbox on a regular basis. View the Entire Article Military.com is protected by copyright until 2022. All intellectual property rights are retained. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without the prior written permission of the author.

Chapter 31- VOC REHAB

Vocational Rehabilitation (Chapter 31) is a program that assists veterans who have a service-connected disability of at least 10% and are in need of vocational rehabilitation services. Vocational rehabilitation pays for a student’s tuition and fees, as well as for books and school supplies, as well as for a monthly living allowance. Because these monies are given directly to the institution, after you have been certified, a precautionary hold is put on your account to ensure that you are not pulled from your classes.

  • on the day when payments are scheduled to be made.
  • Once you have been certified, you will continue to receive notifications about payments, which you can choose to ignore.
  • Please be advised that you will be responsible for covering the charges of these services out of your personal funds.
  • Veterans who qualify for benefits may be eligible for up to 48 months of full-time compensation.

Veterans normally have 12 years from the date on which they are notified of their eligibility to make use of the benefits that have been provided to them. Subsistence allowance rates for Chapter 31 are now in effect.

VA’s Vocational Rehabilitation & VA VOC Rehab – What to Know

What You Need to Know About VA Vocational RehabilitationVA VOC Rehabilitation – What You Need to KnowUpdated|

What Is the VA’s Vocational Rehabilitation (Voc Rehab) Services Program?

It was authorized by Congress under Title 38, United States Code, Chapter 31 of the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VR E – or “voc rehab” as it is sometimes referred to). This program provides assistance to veterans who have service-connected impairments or who have difficulty finding work. It is also available to assist service members who are in the process of transitioning from military to civilian employment in preparing for, as well as finding and retaining, suitable employment opportunities after they leave the military.

These services assist them in enhancing their ability to live as independently as possible in their respective communities.

How Do You Qualify for Vocational Rehabilitation Services?

When it comes to using the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program services, there is a 12-year baseline eligibility requirement that must be met. The 12-year period begins on the later of the veteran’s retirement from active military duty or the date on which he or she was first notified of a service-connected disability rating, whichever occurs first.

Active Duty Qualify for Voc Rehab if they:

  • When you leave active duty, you should expect to obtain an honorable discharge or a discharge that is not considered dishonorable. Acquire an overall VA memorandum rating of 20 percent or greater
  • They are taking part in the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES) or have been certified by the military as having sustained a serious injury or illness that may preclude them from executing their military obligations. Those military members who are taking part in IDEA are deemed to be eligible. This provision, on the other hand, is set to expire in September of 2018. If the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program determines that you require rehabilitation services as a result of an employment handicap, you will be eligible for assistance.

Veterans Qualify for Voc Rehab if they:

  • Awarded an honorable discharge from the military or will be awarded an honorable discharge from the military
  • And A service-connected disability rating of 10 percent or more with a major job handicap, or a rating of 20 percent or more with a minor employment handicap from the Veterans Administration
  • If the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program determines that you require rehabilitation services as a result of an employment handicap, you will be eligible for assistance.
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A vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will work with you to assess whether or not you fulfill the eligibility requirements for unemployment benefits.

What Happens During The VRC’s Comprehensive Evaluation?

There will be the following:

  • A thorough evaluation of the service member’s interests, aptitudes, and talents
  • Evaluation of whether service-connected limitations hinder their capacity to find and/or maintain a job utilizing the occupational skills they have previously acquired
  • Activities of vocational inquiry and goal development that lead to acceptable employment and/or maximal independence at home and in the community
  • In-depth examination of the job market, including statistics on wages

They will also do the following:

  • Assistance in selecting a VR E program track for the service member To attain the targeted employment and/or independent living goals, an individual rehabilitation plan must be developed.

What Goes Into the Voc Rehab and Employment Program’s Rehabilitation Plan?

An personalized recovery plan will be developed, as well as a full explanation of the services that will be given under the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program. The plan is designed to suit the specific requirements of the veteran or service member, and it is a legally binding agreement between the veteran or service member and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Its purpose is to assist veterans and service members in achieving their objectives. There are five tracks that may be employed in the development of a personalized plan for a veteran or service member.

Reemployment

This track will assist them in re-entering the workforce with a former employer. They would also provide support to the efforts of the employer to make reasonable modifications that would allow the veteran or service member to continue on the same or a similar route to their previous employment.

Rapid access to employment

This would be to assist the military member or veteran in finding, applying for, and securing employment. The VA may be able to assist you with professional job placement, job accommodations, and other specialized support services.

Self-Employment

They can assist a service member or veteran in starting a business, analyzing their business plan, and providing training on how to promote and maintain a small business, among other things.

Employment through long-term services

For individuals who want further skills or training, this would be the option to consider.

Educators can aid with educational benefits, job shadowing and training, work-study programs and apprenticeships, and other career preparation programs.

Independent living

This will aid with access to community-based support services, the use of assistive technology and accommodations, and the development of independent living skills through training programs and workshops.

What Other Benefits Does the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program Provide?

In addition, the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program will provide the following services:

  • Services such as ongoing counseling, assistance, and coordination of services are available. Assistance with tutorials
  • Job-searching skills training
  • The Veterans Health Administration can recommend you for medical and dental treatment. Counseling for acclimatization
  • Compensation for training expenses
  • Grants or loans to help pay for post-secondary education at a college, vocational, technical or business school
  • Occupational training (OJT), apprenticeships, and unpaid work experiences are all examples of on-the-job training. Other services that would be required to assist the veteran or service member in obtaining a job and living as independently as possible include the following:

What if You Qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill?

In the event that you are enrolled in the VR E program and are also eligible for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, you may choose to receive the GI Bill rate instead of the Chapter 31 subsistence allowance if you meet the requirements. In the vast majority of circumstances, the GI Bill rate will be greater.

Is There a Subsistence Allowance with Voc Rehab?

A subsistence allowance will be provided to certain military members and veterans who enroll in this program in order to complete an educational or training program in preparation for a future profession. This is paid on a monthly basis and is calculated on the basis of the rate of attendance in a training program, the number of dependents, and the kind of training. If they are qualified for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, they may also be eligible for the BAH program. As an illustration of the subsistence rate, someone with two dependents who is enrolled full time in school would get $942.44 in October 2019 dollars based on current rates.

Training Time Full-time
Dependents
Zero $644.74
One $799.74
Two $942.44
Each Add’l $68.68

The subsistence rate is only available for particular training programs, and you must participate in them full time in order to obtain it. On the VR E Training Programs Subsistence Allowance Rate sheet, you can see the various situations and amounts that are available.

How do you apply fortheVocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program?

To apply, you can do so either online or by completing the Disabled Veterans Application for Vocational Rehabilitation and mailing it to the VA regional office in your area. Regardless of whether your impairment is physical or mental, you may require the additional assistance that the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program can give. The counselors can assist you in achieving your future educational and professional objectives. They can assist you in developing a plan for going to school or finding employment.

RELATED:

  • Instructions on How to Claim Your Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits
  • For Veterans Considering a Career in Education, these are the top four tips. For veterans, here are the top ten jobs and industries to consider. The Top 10 Colleges That Pay the Most Back in Student Loans

About the author

Ms. Provost is a freelance writer and blogger who runs Soldier’s Wife, Crazy Life, a website dedicated to providing assistance to military spouses. She resides in Tennessee with her husband, who is a member of the National Guard, and their three sons.

Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program, Chapter 31

Active duty service members are eligible if they meet the following criteria:

  • When you are released from active duty, you may expect to earn an honorable discharge. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) must give you a memorandum rating of at least 20 percent. Make an application for services from the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR E) program.

Veterans are eligible if they meet the following criteria:

  • Have obtained, or will receive, a discharge that is not considered disgraceful in nature. A service-connected disability rating of at least 10% from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), or a memorandum rating of 20% or more from the VA
  • And Make an application for services from the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR E) program.

How is Eligibility Determined?

The results of the comprehensive evaluation are used by a VA Counselor to determine whether or not a veteran has an employment handicap. Entitlement to services is established for veterans who have a service-connected disability that accounts for 20 percent of their total disability and an employment handicap. Assuming that the disability is at least ten percent service-connected, it is necessary to establish a serious employment handicap in order to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services (see definitions for more details).

Following the determination of entitlement, the veteran and the counselor will collaborate to establish a rehabilitation plan.

Period of Eligibility

Generally speaking, the fundamental period of eligibility during which VR E services may be utilized is 12 years beginning with the latter of the following events:

  • Date of separation from active military service, or the date on which the veteran was first notified by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) of a service-connected disability rating

If a Veteran’s basic period of eligibility is prolonged because a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) decides that the Veteran has a substantial job impairment, the basic period of eligibility may be extended.

Requirements to Maintain Eligibility

A Comprehensive Evaluation is done with the assistance of a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, and it comprises the following components:

  • In order to determine whether or not the veteran is “entitled” to VR E services, a thorough evaluation of the veteran’s interests, aptitudes, and abilities is performed. An evaluation of whether a veteran’s service-connected impairments hinder his or her ability to find and/or maintain employment utilizing the vocational skills that have previously been acquired
  • Exploration of potential career paths and formulation of career objectives

Additional information may be found at VA.gov’s Chapter 31 information page.

  • The purpose of a comprehensive rehabilitation examination is to identify the talents, skills, and interests of the individual for employment. Services in the areas of vocational counseling and rehabilitation planning for employment services Providing employment services such as job training, job-seeking skills, resume development, and other work readiness assistance is a priority. Employment assistance, including the use of special employer incentives and job accommodations, to help people find and keep jobs Occupational training (OJT), apprenticeships, and unpaid work experiences are all examples of on-the-job training. College, vocational, technical, or business school education after completing secondary school
  • Supportive rehabilitation services, such as case management, counseling, and referrals to medical facilities are available. Veterans who are unable to work due to the severity of their impairments might get assistance with independent living.

Make certain that the start and finish dates of your lessons for the term correspond to the Monthly Rate you wish to pay!

Payment Rates

When determining if VA students are eligible for a monthly housing allowance (MHA) or Subsistence Allowance rates, students should use the GI Bill comparison tool, which may be found by calling the General Education Hotline at 1-888-442-4551.

Student Category Submit To Valencia Request From Valencia
First Time Using Benefits

Document Details

  • Acquire a purchase order permission, as well as a Certification of Entrance or Reentrance into Rehabilitation, as well as a Certification of Status.
  • The Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor who was assigned to the case sent the letter.

DD-214: Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty).

  • The DD-214 is provided to a military service member upon his or her retirement, separation, or discharge from active duty military service.

Valencia College Veteran Affairs Certification of Enrollment Request Form

  • The Certification must be presented each semester and may be received at your local Valencia Veterans Services Campus or through the online application process.

What You Need to Know About VR&E — GGU Military

Those who qualify for the Veteran Readiness and Employment Services program can use their benefits to cover some postsecondary programs, although the Post 9-11 GI Bill remains the most widely used veterans’ education benefit among veterans.Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the program — and what you should know before you apply. If you’re a veteran with a service-connected disability, you may be able to use your benefits to cover some postsecondary programs.

What is VR E?

VA’s Veteran Readiness and Employment Services program (abbreviated VR E) is a benefit administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs that provides assistance to veterans who have service-connected disabilities that make it difficult for them to work. Veterans can benefit from the program in a variety of job-related areas, including reemployment, fast entry to employment, self-employment, employment through long-term services, and independent living arrangements. Veterans who require higher levels of education or occupational training in order to retain appropriate work are eligible for the long-term services track.

Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment, also known as Voc Rehab, was a former abbreviation for VR E.

It is also referred to as Chapter 31 in some circles.

Who is eligible?

VR E is available to veterans who have a service-connected disability rating of at least 20% with an employment handicap or a rating of 10% with a serious employment handicap, as determined by the VA, and who have not been discharged or released from the military under dishonorable conditions, as determined by the VA. In other words, if your service-connected disability makes it difficult for you to work, you should consider applying for this program. Active-duty service members who expect to receive an honorable discharge and a VA disability rating of 20 percent or higher are also eligible to apply for this program as well.

What recent changes do I need to know about?

In addition to changing the nomenclature, the VA has made another significant adjustment to VR E. Previously, you were unable to use your VR E benefits in combination with your GI Bill; now, this has changed. This implies that taking use of your VR E benefits for the entire 48 months will not prevent you from taking advantage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which pays for 36 months of education, which is practically the usual duration of a four-year degree program. Keep in mind, however, that this does not work in the other direction.

This modification becomes effective on April 1, 2021.

How much do I get with the benefit?

If you are receiving the benefit, the amount of your monthly subsistence allowance is determined by the number of classes you are enrolled in and whether or not you have dependents. For example, a full-time student with no dependents receives $653.96 per month for the 2020-21 academic year, but a full-time student with two dependents receives $955.92 per month, with an extra $69.66 per month for each additional dependant If you enroll just half-time, the monthly payout is $328.78 if you have no dependents, $407.36 if you have one dependant, and $478.83 if you have two dependents.

If you are also qualified for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you may be entitled to receive a monthly housing allowance that is on par with the BAH rates for active-duty service members in your region if you are also eligible.

More information may be found on the VA’s website, which includes a detailed breakdown.

How do I apply for VR E and get started?

So you think everything sounds okay and you’re ready to submit your application? Great! If you have any questions, please contact your GGU veteran benefits coach, Marlena Blackman, who would be happy to assist you in getting the process started.

Veteran Readiness and Employment

Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR E), originally known as Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (or “Voc Rehab”), is a program that provides assistance to veterans and servicemembers who have service-connected impairments and require assistance finding or keeping work. Chapter 31 of Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations is responsible for implementing the VR E program, and as a result, the benefits are also referred to as “Chapter 31” benefits on occasion. Vocational education, training, and counseling are available via the Department of Veterans Affairs to qualifying military personnel who are actively serving, who have retired, or who have been separated from the service.

This assistance is provided as part of the VA’s Education and Career Counseling program, and it is accessible to qualifying veterans and active duty military personnel who satisfy the program’s eligibility requirements.

A monthly AVRE subsistence allowance is also paid, with the amount determined based on the rate of attendance (full-time or part-time), the number of dependents, and the type of training received.

VA Veteran ReadinessEmployment Benefits

  • Previously known as Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (or “Voc Rehab”), Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR E) provides assistance to veterans and active duty servicemembers who have a disability that has resulted from their service. Due to the fact that the VR E program is implemented under Chapter 31 of Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the benefits are referred to as “Chapter 31” benefits from time to time in the literature. Vocational education, training, and counseling are provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs to qualifying military personnel who are actively serving, who have retired, or who have been separated from the service. Rather than being a transitional benefit for people who are transferring from a military profession to a civilian one, this benefit is designed to be a career assistance benefit and a strategy to maximize VA benefits. All qualifying veterans and active duty service members who satisfy the eligibility requirements can receive this assistance through the VA’s Education and Career Counseling program. The AVRE subsistence payment is also provided each month and is calculated based on the rate of attendance (full-time or part-time), the number of dependents, and the type of training received by the participant.

VR E Education Benefits

Veterans who use the VR E program will no longer be subject to the “48-month rule,” according to changes to the program that will take effect in 2021. This rule was evaluated by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which determined that a more veteran-friendly approach was needed for veterans who wish to use their GI Bill and VA E benefits. Veterans who utilize VR E benefits “prior to using any other VA education program, such as the Montgomery GI Bill or the Forever GI Bill,” according to a revised interpretation of the 48-month requirement, are now entitled to use up to “48 total months” of the other educational aid benefit programs.

This could have an impact on approximately 80,000 veterans who have already participated in VR E programs, as well as thousands of future applicants for VA benefits in the future.

Once the 48 months had been used up (either through one of the programs or through a combination of programs), the 48 months were no longer available.

Notification Of VA Benefit Changes

Veterans who are presently receiving VA education benefits and who may have their benefits affected by the rule changes will be contacted by the VA during the transition period; however, they are under no need to take any action. Those who have been denied GI Bill payments in whole or in part in the past because of their use of VR E may be eligible to file VA Form 22-1995 to request a reconsideration of their case, depending on the circumstances. In the event that you qualify for extra months of entitlement, you will be notified via an award letter.

VA Veteran Readiness Options Online

Individuals receiving VA education benefits who may be affected by the rule changes will be alerted by the VA during the transition time; however, they are under no need to take any action on their own. The VA Form 22-1995, which must be completed and submitted to the VA, can be used by anyone who have been refused benefits in whole or in part in the past because of VR E usage to request a re-examination of their case. Award letters are sent to those who are qualified for an extension of their entitlement to extra months.

The Advent Of e-VA

The Department of Veterans Affairs began pilot testing a technology known as e-VA in early 2020, and the program is expected to be fully operational by 2020. Participants in the Virtual Electronic Assistant program, which is described by the VA as “an artificial intelligence-powered virtual assistant,” were informed about the program. The virtual electronic assistant can be used to schedule appointments, communicate with Vocational Readiness and Employment counselors, and submit documentation in a safe and secure environment.

The inaugural pilot program was designed to operate for six weeks in a variety of venues, including the VA regional offices in the following cities:

A broader, more comprehensive version of the pilot was intended to be launched in the summer of 2020 and would be available to the public across the country. A warning was issued to some VR E participants who chose to participate in the pilot program, informing them that they may need to register twice: once for the pilot program and again for the full-fledged national version.

How e-VA Works

First and foremost, you must be registered in VR E. Following the establishment of this relationship, veterans will get a text message or email introducing them to the program and the e-VA virtual assistant. Most crucially, this message will include an opt-in request, which you must accept. Because participation in this program is entirely voluntary, anyone who prefer not to react or use the service may do so. Those who wish to enroll will be able to begin using e-VA services immediately; however, you must choose to participate; the program does not include you automatically.

e-VA is available via text messaging and/or email, but your VR E counselor is still available to assist you in person, as well as over the phone or through tele-counseling, according to the official VA website.

Veteran Readiness Eligibility

  • Veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of at least 20% and an employment handicap OR veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of at least 10% and a serious employment handicap who were discharged or released from military service under conditions other than dishonorable discharge or release Servicemembers who will be transitioning within six months after their separation from active service
  • Veterans within one year of their separation from active duty
  • Any Servicemember/Veteran who is currently eligible for a VA education benefit
  • And Everyone who is currently enrolled in a VA education program

Period of Eligibility

  • Date of departure from active military duty, or the date on which the Veteran was initially told by the VA that he or she had a service-connected disability rating

The eligibility period of 12 years can be extended if certain conditions prevent the claimant from participating in the program or if the claimant has a serious employment handicap that prevents them from working.

What is an Entitlement Determination?

A Veterans Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) works with veterans to determine whether or not they have a disability that prevents them from finding job. If a Veteran’s service-connected impairment hinders his or her ability to acquire and keep employment, the Veteran has an employment disadvantage.

What is VR E Rehab?

Veteran Readiness and Work (VR E) is a joint federal-state initiative that aims to help people with physical or cognitive impairments obtain and/or maintain gainful employment. It is also referred to as Chapter-31 Rehab in some circles. When it comes to military veterans, the program is designed to assist people who have “service-connected impairments” and “employment handicaps,” respectively. In order for a service member to be classified as having a “service linked disability,” an injury or sickness must have occurred or been worsened while the service member was engaged in active military duty.

  • A nexus letter from a doctor is frequently very helpful in demonstrating this critical connection.
  • A further requirement is that the impairment be significantly associated with a service-connected disability.
  • People who qualify for benefits under one or more of the criteria outlined above can submit an electronic application using the Department of Veterans Affairs’ eBenefits portal or fill out VA Form 28-8832, which is accessible as a downloadable pdf on the VA’s official website.
  • You can find the location of the nearest VA regional office by visiting the official VA website.

Upon receipt of your documentation, which will be reviewed and approved, you will be invited to an orientation session at the VA regional office, where you will learn about programs that can assist you in the following areas, according to the VA’s official website:

  • Understand the best job alternatives for you based on your interests and talents, and make an informed decision. Guideline on how to make the most of your VA benefits and/or other resources in order to achieve your educational and career goals
  • Benefits Coaching Assistance with Academic or Adjustment Counseling and Individualized Support to assist you in removing any obstacles to your achievement

Although your access to some programs may be limited by availability at the local level if you are currently serving in an overseas military assignment, depending on the program, you may be able to participate in online sessions or “distance learning” type programs if you are currently serving in an overseas military assignment. Air Force veteran Joe Wallace served in the United States Air Force for 13 years, and he previously worked as a reporter for Air Force Television News.

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Vocational Rehabilitation

Voc Rehab, which is an abbreviation for Vocational Rehabilitation, refers to two programs that operate in Vermont and are both known by the same initials. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs runs a Voc Rehab program that is tailored exclusively to the needs of handicapped veterans. Voc Rehab is a program run by the Vermont Agency of Human Services that is available to any Vermonter who has a disability.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation

Veterans with service-connected impairments can get vocational rehabilitation via the VA. Veterans with a service-connected disability rating of 20 percent or above are often eligible, although veterans with a 10 percent rating may also be eligible if their service-connected condition causes a substantial work handicap. If a veteran is eligible for VA Voc Rehab, the VA will pay for him or her to attend college or a training program that will prepare him or her for work upon graduation, as well as for a subsistence allowance.

If you are interested in applying for VA Voc Rehab, you should make contact with the Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) professional who is closest to you.

All VA Voc Rehab administration is done in White River Junction, Vermont, which is the state capital.

  • The American Legion Veteran Service Officer (Office at White River Junction) – (802) 296-5166
  • The Disabled American Veterans Veteran Service Officer (Office at White River Junction) – (802) 296-5167
  • The Veterans of Foreign Wars Veteran Service Officer (Office at White River Junction) – (802) 296-5168
  • The Vietnam Veterans of America (Various Locations Statewide) – (603) 903-1257
  • And the State of Vermont Veteran Service Officer Program (Travel) – (80

Agency of Human Services Vocational Rehabilitation

AHS Voc Rehab is available to everyone with a disability. Vets who suffer from impairments, even if the ailments are not a result of their military service, may be eligible for benefits under this program. It is the goal of this Voc Rehab to work with you to identify careers that are a good fit for your abilities and interests; to assist you in obtaining the necessary training to pursue these careers; to assist you in finding employment; and to collaborate with your employer to ensure that your experience transitioning back into the workforce is a positive one.

To begin, contact the office that is most convenient for you.

  • Regional offices in Barre-Montpelier are (802) 479-4210
  • Morrisville District offices are (802) 888-5976
  • Newport District offices are (802) 334-6794
  • St. Johnsbury District offices are (802) 748-8716
  • Burlington Regional offices are (802) 863-7500
  • Middlebury District offices are (802) 388-4666
  • St. Albans District offices are (802) 524-7950
  • Rutland Regional offices are

Which One is Better for Me?

That is dependent on your circumstances. Because every handicapped veteran has his or her own set of interests and requirements, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to evaluating what would work best for you in your particular circumstance.

Contact these schools and discuss your objectives with them before deciding on the program that best suits your needs and circumstances. This may imply the use of both!

What is the Purpose of Voc Rehab?

Vocational Rehabilitation assists persons with disabilities in preparing for employment that fulfills their requirements as well as the needs of the employer. There are other options, including career retraining and returning to school, as well as learning how to continue doing what you’ve done in a different way. The ultimate purpose of both programs is to help participants obtain meaningful work.

Does Anyone Else Help Disabled Veterans Find New Careers?

Yes. The Vermont Association of Business, Industry, and Rehabilitation (VABIR) is a non-profit organization that assists job seekers with disabilities in finding employment opportunities in local areas. Visitors to their website may see a list of their offices located around the state of California.

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