How To Rehab A Broken Ankle? (TOP 5 Tips)

What is the healing process for a broken ankle?

  • Healing Time for a Broken Foot. The healing process is completed in three stages: inflammatory/injury, consolidatory/bone production, and maturation/bone remodeling. The entire broken foot healing process spans an average of 12-15 weeks. This duration does not include physical therapy sessions.

Contents

How long does it take to walk properly after a broken ankle?

It takes around six to 10 weeks to recover from a broken ankle. During this time, you will probably need to wear a cast or boot. Most people are able to walk normally again and resume their daily activities by around three months.

How long does it take to heal a broken ankle?

It takes at least 6 weeks for the broken bones to heal. It may take longer for the involved ligaments and tendons to heal. As mentioned above, your doctor will most likely monitor the bone healing with repeated x-rays. This is typically done more often during the first 6 weeks if surgery is not chosen.

Can you fully recover from a broken ankle?

You can expect most ankle fractures depending on how severe they are, to take 4-8 weeks for the bones to heal completely and up to several months to regain full use and range of motion of the joint. More severe fractures, especially those requiring surgical repair, may take longer to heal.

Is physical therapy necessary after a broken ankle?

Even if your ankle fracture has healed, you still need physical therapy to ensure your ankle and lower leg are in pristine condition. When a fracture occurs, the area is generally immobilized, so the body can heal the fracture.

Will my broken ankle ever stop hurting?

Your doctor fixed a broken (fractured) bone without surgery. You can expect the pain from the bone to get much better almost right after the procedure. But you may have some pain for 2 to 3 weeks and mild pain for up to 6 weeks after surgery.

How long is physical therapy for a broken ankle?

In general, physical therapy for a broken ankle lasts about 6 to 8 weeks. Your personal experience with PT may be shorter or longer depending on your specific injury. Continuing your home exercise program is a component of your rehabilitation.

What are the long term effects of a broken ankle?

Long term effects of ankle fractures have been reported to include physical, psychological, and social consequences [9]. It has been reported that physical impairments following ankle fractures may include pain, functional impairment and the development of post-trauma arthritis [16].

How do I know if my broken ankle is healing?

Signs Your Broken Bone Is Healing

  1. What You Experience During Healing. The following steps are what you will go through as your broken bone is healing:
  2. Pain Decreases.
  3. Range of Motion Increases.
  4. Swelling Goes Down.
  5. Bruising Subsides.
  6. Orthopedic Clinic in Clinton Township, MI.

What happens if you walk on a broken ankle too soon?

If your fracture is mild and hairline, your doctor may allow you early weight bearing and walking on your ankle. However, a serious broken ankle will take time in recovery and delay walking. Walking on a broken ankle too soon may result in unbearable pain or discomfort from the slightest of movement.

How does age affect fracture healing?

Increasing age has been shown to negatively affect the cellular and molecular processes throughout the different stages of bone fracture healing. Inflammatory regulation, cellular differentiation, and signaling cascades are all affected, in part, by age-related changes.

What helps broken bones heal faster?

Vitamins and minerals including calcium and Vitamin D are essential to bone health. A diet rich in those nutrients, including dairy products, green vegetables, cod liver oil, certain fatty fish and eggs can help boost bone health and speed healing.

How do you start weight-bearing after a broken ankle?

We generally recommend becoming full weight-bearing in the boot prior to any of our boot weaning protocols. Generally, when patients are placing between 50 and 75% of the weight on the injured leg they are able to transition to using 1 crutch or cane on the opposite side.

When should I start physio after ankle fracture?

The next step of physiotherapy happens once the ankle has been set and is somewhat healed, normally six to ten weeks after the injury. Then the patient will begin to attend appointments with a physiotherapist to begin the rehabilitation process.

How a Physical Therapy Exercise Progression Helps Ankle Fractures

Photograph by Jeannot Olivet / Getty Images Following an ankle fracture, your physical therapist will likely suggest ankle range of motion (ROM) exercises as one of the first things you should do once you are out of your cast or brace. You may be asked to actively move your ankle joint by your physical therapist in order to enhance the range of motion around the joint. Your physical therapist may passively move your ankle joint through various motions. For example, some basic exercises to perform to increase ankle range of motion include pointing your toes up and down as far as possible, and moving your foot in and out, which are motions referred to as inversion and eversion in the medical community.

Ankle alphabet is a fun exercise to undertake to enhance ankle ROM after a fracture that might help you recover faster.

Draw each letter in both upper and lower case carefully and thoughtfully, using both upper and lower case.

Expect to feel some discomfort during the exercises, but cease immediately if you experience any prolonged or acute discomfort.

Once you have mastered the range of motion exercises, it is time to begin working on improving ankle flexibility with the following exercise.

What to Expect From Physical Therapy After an Ankle Fracture

The ability to conduct fundamental functional tasks such as running and walking might be significantly hampered if your ankle is shattered. This severe injury can result in a loss of lower extremity strength, a reduction in range of motion, and a lot of discomfort. It may be difficult or impossible to carry out your typical daily tasks as a result of these difficulties. Physical therapy (PT) may be beneficial following a fractured ankle since it can assist you in regaining full functional mobility and returning to your prior level of physical activity.

Ankle Fracture Symptoms and Causes

Your ankle is a joint in which the talus bone of the foot connects with and moves with the tibia (shin bone) and fibula of the leg, and vice versa. Trauma to this area can result in a break in any or all of these bones, with substantial pain typically occurring quickly after the injury. When there is a traumatic incident to the body, an ankle fracture nearly invariably occurs. Ankle fractures can be caused by a variety of circumstances, including automobile accidents, falls, and sports injuries.

First and foremost, if you have any suspicions that you have a fractured bone in your ankle, you should seek medical assistance immediately. This may result in a considerable reduction in function.

Treatment

A reduction of the fracture may be attempted while you are in the hospital following an ankle fracture, depending on the circumstances. Fracture reduction is the phrase used to describe the process of repairing or setting a fractured bone after it has been broken. It is necessary to place the pieces of bone in close contact to one another in order for mending to take place. In order to guarantee that the bone heals properly and that irreversible functional loss or deformity does not occur, fracture reduction must be accomplished.

Ankle immobilization helps the bones to recover properly and prevents further damage.

Additionally, you may be subject to special weight-bearing limits.

Physical Therapy

You may be referred to physical therapy once your fracture has been reduced and immobilized. Physical therapy will teach you how to use crutches, an acane, or a walker, among other assistive devices. You should be able to better comprehend your weight-bearing limitations with the guidance of your physical therapist as well. Light knee and hip exercises can be conducted to ensure that the muscle groups that assist you in walking do not become too weak as a result of your fracture healing. If you are wearing a cast or a brace on your ankle, it is unlikely that you will be undertaking ankle strengthening activities.

A cane or crutches may be necessary to help you walk more effectively.

The ankle assessment may comprise the following components: If you have open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgery, you should have your scar evaluated.

The use of treatment modalities such as heat, ice, or electrical stimulation to assist alleviate swelling or discomfort around your ankle may be recommended by him or her.

Exercises

If you have suffered an ankle fracture, an ankle fracture exercise program should be the most important component of your rehabilitation after the fracture. Make sure to follow your physical therapist’s instructions to the letter and to ask any questions you may have if you have any. Among the exercises for ankle fracture recovery are the following:

  • A range of motion exercises for the ankles
  • Ankle strengthening activities
  • Hip and knee exercises (to aid in the improvement of walking abilities)
  • Balance and proprioception exercises Functional mobility and walking capacity can be improved by exercise.

You’ll almost certainly be forced to follow a home workout regimen for your fractured ankle when it has healed. Depending on your situation, this program may continue for several months after physical therapy has ended, and it may be a crucial component of your long-term rehabilitation success. Wolff’s law indicates that bone develops and remodels in response to the amount of stress that it is subjected to. Your physical therapist can assist you in prescribing exercises that apply the appropriate amount of stress in the appropriate direction to guarantee that maximum bone healing happens and that your broken ankle will function normally.

Your physical therapist can aid you in making the transition from utilizing an assistive device to walking on your own.

Scar tissue massage and mobilization can be performed by your physical therapist to assist in improving the mobility of the scar. In addition, he or she can instruct you on how to execute scar massage treatments on yourself.

How Long Will Physical Therapy Last?

Everyone recovers in their own way, and every ankle fracture injury is unique in its own way. In the course of your ankle fracture rehabilitation, your physical therapist should talk with you about your overall prognosis. In most cases, your prognosis will be determined by how well your ankle moves when you initially begin rehabilitation. Physical treatment for a fractured ankle usually lasts between 6 and 8 weeks in most cases. Depending on the nature of your ailment, your particular physical therapy session may be shorter or longer.

If you are consistent with it, it can assist you in regaining function and returning to the activities you have been missing.

A Word From Verywell

You may be unable to walk or run for several weeks after an ankle fracture. You may also be unable to engage completely in your job or leisure activities. Physical therapy following an ankle fracture can assist you in regaining mobility and allowing you to return to your previous level of activity and function.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When will I be able to walk again after having my ankle broken? It is possible that you will be able to walk on your own within six to eight weeks if you do not require surgery. If your fracture necessitated surgery, you may be placed in a walking cast after two weeks
  • Four to six weeks later, you may be able to bear some weight and be moved to a cast with a walker or crutches
  • And four to six weeks after that, you may be able to bear some weight and be moved to a cast with crutches. If this is the case, it may take many weeks before you are able to completely bear your weight and walk without assistance. What workouts should I perform if I’m no longer wearing an ankle brace or cast? Start with a series of range-of-motion exercises. At first, a physical therapist will be able to manipulate your ankle. After that, you will be able to perform activities on your own, such as pointing your toes and moving your foot in and out of the shoe. Although they may be mildly unpleasant at first as you become acclimated to moving the joint again, they should not cause significant or long-lasting discomfort.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts! Thank you for taking the time to join up. There was a clerical error. Please try your search again. Verywell Health relies on only high-quality sources, such as peer-reviewed research, to substantiate the information contained in its articles. Read about oureditorial process to discover more about how we fact-check our information and ensure that it is accurate, dependable, and trustworthy.

  1. The University of Michigan’s Health System. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons provides information on sprained ankle rehabilitation exercises. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons guidelines for ankle fractures (broken ankle). Ankle fractures (broken ankle) are treated at John Hopkins Hospital. Open reduction and internal fixation of an ankle fracture at the University of Michigan Health System. Injury to the ankle (fractured or broken ankle)
  2. Alazzawi S, Sukeik M, King D, Vemulapalli K. Alazzawi S, Sukeik M, King D, Vemulapalli K. In this article, we will discuss the history and clinical examination of the foot and ankle. World Journal of Orthopedics, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 21-29, 2017. American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, doi:10.5312/wjo.v8.i1.21
  3. World Journal of Ophthalmology. Modalities of Therapeutic Interventions
  4. Teichtahl, A.J
  5. Wluka, A.E.
  6. Wijethilake, P.
  7. And colleagues (Teichtahl et al. Wolff’s law in action: a potential mechanism for the development of early knee osteoarthritis. Arthritis Research and Therapy17, 207 (2015). doi:10.1186/s13075-015-0738-7
  8. Hoeve S van, Houben M, Verbruggen JPAM, Willems P, Meijer K, Poeze M. Arthritis Research and Therapy17, 207 (2015). doi:10.1186/s13075-015-0738-7
  9. Hoeve S van, Houben M, Verbruggen JPAM, Willems P, Meijer K Gait analysis was found to be associated with functional outcome in individuals who had ankle fractures operated on. Cleveland Clinic. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2019
  10. 37(7):1658-1666. doi:10.1002/jor.24071
  11. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2019
  12. 37(7):1658-1666. Stress fractures: management and treatment
  13. Beckenkamp PR, Lin CC, Herbert RD, et al. Stress fractures: management and treatment EXACTLY: following an ankle fracture, exercise or counseling should be sought. Designing a randomised controlled experiment is a difficult task. Musculoskeletal Disorders, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2011
  14. 12:148. doi:10.1186/1471-2474-12-148.
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Ankle Fracture: Rehab Exercises

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Introduction

Here are a few examples of workouts that you may try out for yourself. The exercises may be recommended for a specific disease or for rehabilitation. Start each exercise cautiously to avoid injury. If you begin to experience discomfort, reduce the intensity of the workouts. You will be instructed on when to begin these workouts as well as which ones will be most beneficial to you.

How to do the exercises

1st slide out of 10 Leg stretch on the first of ten slides (knee straight), It is necessary to use a towel for this activity.

  1. Sit with your afflicted leg straight and supported on the floor in a comfortable position. It’s important to keep your other leg bent and your foot flat on the floor. Wrap a towel over the bottom of your afflicted foot, right below the toes
  2. Holding one end of the towel in each hand, with your hands over your knees, perform the following: Pulling back slowly with the towel will cause your foot to extend toward you. Maintain the position for a minimum of 15 to 30 seconds
  3. Repeat 2 to 4 times every session for a total of up to 5 sessions per day.

Calf stretch (knee bent)

Slide number two of ten stretch the calf muscles on slide number 2 of 10. (knee bent), It is necessary to use a towel for this activity. In addition, you will require a cushion or a foam roll.

  1. Sit with your afflicted leg straight and supported on the floor in a comfortable position. It’s important to keep your other leg bent and your foot flat on the floor. Put a pillow or a foam roll beneath the injured leg to cushion it. Wrap a towel over the bottom of your afflicted foot, right below the toes
  2. Holding one end of the towel in each hand, with your hands over your knees, perform the following: Pulling back slowly with the towel will cause your foot to extend toward you. Maintain the position for a minimum of 15 to 30 seconds
  3. Repeat 2 to 4 times every session for a total of up to 5 sessions per day.

Ankle plantar flexion

3rd slide out of 10 Ankle plantar flexion is seen on slide 3 of 10.

  1. Sit with your afflicted leg straight and supported on the floor in a comfortable position. Maintaining the straightness of your afflicted leg, gradually flex your foot downward so that your toes are directed away from your body
  2. Maintain the straightness of your other leg, with that foot flat on the floor Afterwards, carefully return your foot to its original position. Repeat the process 8 to 12 times.

Ankle dorsiflexion

Slide 4 of a total of 10 Ankle dorsiflexion is seen on slide 4 of 10.

  1. Sit with your afflicted leg straight and supported on the floor in a comfortable position. Maintaining the straightness of your affected leg, slowly flex your affected foot back toward your body so that your toes point upward while keeping your other leg bent. After then, carefully return your foot to its starting position
  2. Repeat 8 to 12 times
  3. And

Resisted ankle plantar flexion

Slide number five of ten Resisted ankle plantar flexion is the fifth slide in the series. You will need an elastic exercise material, such as surgical tubing or Thera-Band, for the next four exercises to be successful.

  1. Sit with your afflicted leg straight and supported on the floor in a comfortable position. It’s important to keep your other leg bent and your foot flat on the floor. Wrap an elastic band over the ball of your afflicted foot, right below the toes
  2. Each end of the band should be held in each hand, with your hands just above your knees. Maintaining the straightness of your afflicted leg, slowly bend your foot downward so that your toes are directed away from your torso. Afterwards, carefully return your foot to its original position. Repeat the process 8 to 12 times.

Resisted ankle dorsiflexion

Slide 6 of a total of 10 Resisted ankle dorsiflexion is shown on slide 6 of 10.

  1. Make a loop out of the ends of an exercise band by tying them together. Make a secure item out of one end of the loop, such as a table leg, or close a door on one end of the loop to keep it in place. (Alternatively, you may have someone hold one end of the loop to give resistance.) Put your afflicted foot in a shoe and loop the other end of the band around it while you’re seated on the floor or in a chair. Continue to keep your knee and leg straight as you gently flex your foot toward you to draw back on the exercise band, and then slowly release the foot. Repeat the process 8 to 12 times.

Resisted ankle inversion

Slide number seven of ten The seventh slide of ten, “Resisted ankle inversion,”

  1. Placing your healthy leg across the other leg while sitting on the floor Holding both ends of an exercise band in your hands, wrap the band over the inside of your afflicted foot until it is snug. Afterwards, place your healthy foot against the band. Slowly press your afflicted foot against the band while keeping your knees crossed so that the foot travels away from your good foot. Then gently begin to decompress
  2. Repeat the process 8 to 12 times.

Resisted ankle eversion

Slide number eight out of ten The eighth slide of ten, Resisted ankle eversion

  1. Sit on the floor with your legs straight
  2. Grasp both ends of an exercise band and loop the band around the outside of the afflicted foot. Repeat on the other foot. Afterwards, place your healthy foot against the band. Slowly press your afflicted foot outward against the band and away from your healthy foot while keeping your leg straight. Do not allow your leg to spin. Then gently begin to decompress
  3. Repeat the process 8 to 12 times.

Ankle alphabet

Slide number nine of ten Ankle alphabet, slide 9 of 10, Ankle alphabet,

  1. Make sure your feet are flat on the floor while sitting in a chair. If you prefer, you can perform this exercise while laying on your back with your injured leg supported up on a cushion. Elevate your afflicted foot’s heel off the floor and draw the letters of the alphabet gently with your other foot

Heel raises

Slide number ten out of ten On slide 10 of 10, the heel is raised.

  1. Maintain a comfortable standing position with your feet a few inches apart and your hands lightly resting on the counter or chair in front of you. While maintaining a straight line between your knees, slowly elevate your heels off the floor. Slowly drop your heels to the floor after holding for about 6 seconds: Work out for 8 to 12 reps multiple times throughout the day.

Follow-up care is critical to the success of your therapy and overall safety.

Make careful to keep all of your appointments and to show up on time, and call your doctor if you are experiencing any difficulties. Keep track of your test results, as well as a record of the medications you’re taking, for future reference.

Where can you learn more?

For additional information on “Ankle Fracture: Rehab Exercises,” type “EnterT800” into the search box. As of July 1, 2021, the information is current. Author:Healthwise Adam Husney, MD – Family Medicine, served as the medical reviewer for the staff. Dr. E. Gregory Thompson is an Internal Medicine specialist. Dr. Kathleen Romito is a Family Medicine specialist.

Guide

An ankle fracture occurs when a bone on one or both sides of the ankle is partly or totally shattered, which can occur on either side of the ankle. The majority of ankle fractures are caused by twisting injuries and falls, as well as injuries sustained when participating in sports or playing. The majority of ankle fractures occur in men under the age of 50. Women are more likely than males to have ankle fractures beyond the age of 50. There are several types of ankle fractures, ranging from basic to severe, and they can affect one or all three bones that make up the ankle joint.

Physical therapy plays a crucial part in your treatment and rehabilitation from an ankle fracture, as well as your ability to return to regular activities after you have had the fracture repaired.

They improve the quality of life of their patients via hands-on treatment, patient education, and prescribed physical activity.

Find a PT is a website that can help you locate a physical therapist in your region.

What Is an Ankle Fracture?

An ankle fracture is a damaged bone on one or both sides of the ankle joint that is totally or partly shattered. Ankle fractures can occur in a variety of ways, with one, two, or three bones being shattered in certain cases. The following are the classifications depending on the number of shattered bones:

  • Fracture of the lateral malleolus. The fibula, which is located on the outside of the ankle, is the only bone that has been shattered. Fracture of the medial malleolus. The tibia, which is the bone on the inside of the ankle, is the only bone that has been shattered. Bimalleolar fracture is a kind of fracture in which two malleolar bones are broken at the same time. The fibula and the tibia are both shattered, causing the injury. Trimalleolar fracture is a type of fracture that occurs in three parts. Specifically, the fibula, tibia, and posterior malleolus (the tibia located in the rear of the foot) are all shattered.

The severity of the fracture is divided into the following categories:

  • Nondisplaced. The parts of the cracked bone are still arranged in a straight line. Displaced. The two pieces of the shattered bone are not aligned with one another. Comminuted. A splinter or many tiny bits of bone are discovered at the site of the fracture. Fracture with a lot of moving parts. Significant damage has occurred to the soft tissue that surrounds the fractured bone. Fracture of the Compound Bone. Fracture fragments have the potential to puncture the skin.

Whenever a fracture involves several shattered bones or when the bones do not remain in their original alignment, the fracture is called unstable and requires rapid medical attention. In addition to the possibility of infection, a complex fracture is a complication.

Signs and Symptoms

People who suffer an ankle fracture may have the following symptoms:

  • After a twisting injury or a fall, you will experience immediate and acute pain. The injury was caused by a “pop” or “snap” that could be felt or heard at the time of the accident. Ankle swells up with fluid
  • Tenderness or discomfort in the ankle region
  • When standing or walking, it is difficult to bear weight on the ankle. It is impossible for you to bear any weight on your ankle at all. Bruising
  • When you are active, the pain gets worse and gets better with rest. Due to swelling and agony, it is impossible to put on a shoe. At the ankle, there is a lump or deformity that can be seen or felt.

How Is It Diagnosed?

If you visit your physical therapist after suffering an ankle injury, the physical therapist will inquire about your medical history as well as the circumstances surrounding the accident. During your physical therapy session, your physical therapist will assess your ability to walk and bear weight on the damaged side, as well as gently evaluate the afflicted region for signs of edema, deformity, and discomfort. Your physical therapist will also evaluate your foot and lower leg to see whether any other portions of your body have been affected by the injury.

An x-ray is required to determine whether or not an ankle fracture has occurred.

It is critical to have an ankle injury evaluated by a physical therapist or medical practitioner as soon as possible after suffering an ankle injury in order to distinguish between a severe sprain and a shattered bone.

If the bone is penetrating the skin, go to the nearest hospital emergency department as soon as possible.

How Can a Physical Therapist Help?

If you see your physical therapist following your accident and it is determined that you have an ankle fracture, your physical therapist will:

  • Educate you on the RICE protocol for acute injury management, which stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation
  • And Reduce the amount of movement in your ankle by wrapping it with an ace bandage or putting a stirrup brace to keep it from swelling. Apply ice to the affected area to relieve discomfort and swelling
  • Instruct you to elevate the ankle that has been injured in order to minimize edema. Instruct you to walk using crutches or a walker to avoid placing any weight on the damaged ankle
  • Formalize suggestions for further treatment with an orthopedic physician or in the emergency department.

Depending on how many bones are shattered and whether it is a basic, complicated, or compound fracture, the therapy for an ankle fracture will be different for each person. The first step in treating a fracture is for your doctor to realign and stabilize the bones, which can be done in the hospital emergency department or, if necessary, with surgery.

After Surgery

If surgery is necessary, the afflicted ankle will be immobilized in a cast or fracture boot to ensure that it remains stable after the procedure. Once you have been declared medically stable, a physical therapist will come to your hospital room to assist you in getting up and out of bed. In order to stand up, your physical therapist will assist you in sitting up on the bedside table. You will not be able to put any weight on the ankle that has been injured for about 6 to 10 weeks. Walking with the use of an assistive device, such as crutches or a walker, is something your physical therapy will teach you how to do.

After receiving confirmation from an x-ray that the fracture has healed, your doctor will remove the cast.

If You Do Not Require Surgery

After a fractured ankle has been treated by a physician and immobilized, a physical therapist can assist in the recovery process. After the bone has healed, a physical therapist can assist you in regaining your strength, range of motion, balance, and athletic abilities. You will learn how to walk without bearing weight on the damaged ankle after your injured leg has been cast or cast booted by your physical therapist utilizing crutches or a walker after your injured leg has been cast or booted.

Your physical therapist will assist you in selecting the equipment that is most appropriate for your requirements.

The following will be included in physical therapy treatment:

  • Instructions on how to walk. Your physical therapist will assist you in beginning to bear part of your weight on the damaged leg, with the goal of progressively increasing your weight to the full amount recommended by your physician. Training your gait. Your physical therapist will provide you with specific instructions and exercises to help you get back into a normal walking routine. The movement of your foot and ankle, as well as the time of your steps, will be the primary emphasis. Using a low-speed treadmill, flat ground, and stairwells are all good places to practice. Swelling is being reduced. After an ankle fracture, it is typical to have swelling. Gentle massage, the use of a compression wrap, the application of cold or heat, and elevating the afflicted ankle while at rest are all possible treatments. Exercise. In order to help you strengthen and restore motion in your damaged ankle, your physical therapist will devise an exercise program that you may begin as soon as the cast is removed. It is critical to regaining the capacity to bend your ankle in order to regain your complete walking ability
  • This is referred to as Restoring Ankle Mobilty. During manual (hands-on) therapy, your physical therapist may gently manipulate your foot and ankle joints and surrounding tissues to reduce stiffness and enhance the ankle’s bending range of motion
  • Return to work or play activity. As you develop strength and flexibility, your physical therapist will give you with activity training that is tailored to your work, leisure activity, or sporting activity.
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The return to full involvement in sports and job activities usually happens between 12 and 16 weeks after an ankle fracture has healed completely. Note: Physical therapy treatment varies from person to person and is determined by the type of injury sustained, the manner in which it is healing, if surgery was performed, as well as the patient’s age and physical health.

Can This Injury or Condition Be Prevented?

The majority of ankle fractures are not preventable.

Some safeguards, on the other hand, may be necessary. To lower your chances of suffering an ankle injury, do the following:

  • When engaging in sports, make sure you’re wearing the proper protection gear. Train to achieve your highest possible levels of strength and fitness
  • Wear appropriate footwear, and replace athletic shoes on a regular basis.

To lower your chance of falling, do the following:

  • Reduce the amount of obstructions and clutter in your home’s corridors and rooms
  • Work and play in settings that are well-lighted
  • Make use of night lighting in your home
  • Grab bars should be installed in the tub and shower areas. Railings should be installed on both sides of stairways. Maintaining your strength and fitness throughout your life is essential.

What Kind of Physical Therapist Do I Need?

Physical therapists are all trained and experienced in the treatment of ankle fractures, as a result of their education and experience. However, you might want to think about the following:

  • Physical therapists are all trained and experienced in the treatment of ankle fractures, thanks to their education and experience. You might want to think about the following, however:

The American Physical Therapy Association created Find a PT, an online tool that allows you to look for physical therapists in your area who have specific clinical expertise. You can find these and other credentials by searching for physical therapists in your area who have these and other credentials. When looking for a physical therapist (or any other type of health care practitioner), here are some general guidelines:

  • Find out who to ask for recommendations from: relatives and friends, or other health-care professionals. Whenever you call a physical therapy facility to schedule an appointment, inquire about the physical therapists’ previous expertise in assisting clients who have fractured an ankle. Ensure that you are prepared to discuss your symptoms in as much detail as possible, as well as what makes your symptoms worse

Find a Physical Therapist in Your Area!

Is this content helpful?

Thank you very much. Your feedback has been forwarded to the appropriate party. The American Physical Therapy Association believes that consumers should have access to information that can assist them in making health-care decisions, as well as information that can prepare them for their visit with their health-care professional. In the following articles, you will find some of the most up-to-date scientific information on the topic of physical therapy treatment for ankle fractures. The papers present the results of recent research and provide an overview of the standards of practice in the United States as well as in other countries.

  1. Goost H, Wimmer MD, Barg A, Kabir K, Valderrabano V, Burger C, Wimmer MD, Barg A, Kabir K, Valderrabano V, Burger C A review of the examination and treatment options for ankle joint fractures German Medical Journal International 2014; 111(21):377–388.
  2. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is an acronym that stands for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  3. The most recent update was made on December 30, 2014.
  4. J.M.
  5. Svoboda, and J.P.
  6. Detection and treatment of an isolated posterior malleolar fracture in a young female military cadet: a resident-authored case report International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 2012;7(2):167–172.
  7. PubMed contains millions of citations to biomedical literature, including citations to articles in the MEDLINE database maintained by the National Library of Medicine.

Guide is the type of content you’re looking for. Ankle Fracture is one of the most common conditions. Mary Kay Zane, PT, board-certified clinical expert in orthopaedic physical therapy, is the author(s) of this article. Expert Reviewer (s) The editorial board has made a decision.

You Might Also Like.

Thursday, October 4, 2019 A sprained ankle can put a complete stop to your everyday activities. When you have an ankle fracture, you will be unable to conduct even the most fundamental of activities, such as walking. A lot of folks believe that they are fully recovered once their fracture has healed. This, however, is not the case. Even after your ankle fracture has healed, you will still require physical therapy to ensure that your ankle and lower leg are in optimal shape for walking. Generally, when a fracture develops, the affected part is immobilized to allow the body to mend the fracture.

As a result of the healing process, your ankle will not be as strong or stable as it was before the fracture occurred.

How Does Physical Therapy Help?

Physical therapy helps your body to be in the best possible shape so that it can perform as it should. It is the treatment of orthopedic pain and disorders using methods such as exercise, massage, and other therapies that is referred to as physical therapy. Your ankle will need to be rehabilitated once it has healed to ensure that it can move freely again. Physical therapy will assist you in reaching your goals. Before designing a personalized physical therapy plan for you, your physical therapist will learn about your medical history, the freshly healed fracture, and your general health to better understand your needs.

  • In order to do this, your physical therapist may include the following activities in your physical therapy plan: Exercises to Increase Flexibility When it comes to maintaining proper ankle function, flexibility is essential.
  • When you suffer a fracture and are unable to utilize your ankle, the tendons, ligaments, and muscles in the surrounding area become stiff and uncomfortable.
  • It is possible to injure yourself if you extend them too soon.
  • They are capable of doing this in a safe manner to prevent you from becoming hurt again.
  • In other words, your ankle is weaker than it used to be.
  • Exercises for Maintaining Balance A weakened ankle as a result of a fracture injury can be extremely unstable.

It is possible that you will have difficulty standing or walking and that you will lose your equilibrium. Physical therapy can assist you in regaining stability in your ankle so that you do not run the danger of falling over or reinjuring yourself.

Consult with a Physical Therapist

It is via physical therapy that your body is restored to its optimal functioning state. It is the treatment of orthopedic pain and disorders through methods such as exercise, massage, and other therapies that is referred to as physical therapy. Your ankle will need to be rehabilitated once it has healed to ensure that it can be used properly again. Your physical therapist will assist you in reaching your goals. In order to create a personalized physical therapy plan for you, your physical therapist will learn about your medical history, the freshly healed fracture, and your general health.

  • As part of your physical treatment regimen, your physical therapist may incorporate the following elements: Exercises for Increasing Flexibility When it comes to proper ankle function, flexibility is essential.
  • Tendons, ligaments, and muscles around the ankle become stiff when you suffer a fracture and are unable to move it.
  • It is possible to injure yourself if you extend them too fast.
  • So that you don’t get hurt again, they may perform it in a safe method for you.
  • In other words, your ankle is weaker than it was before the injury.
  • Exercises to Maintain Balance It is possible to have a very unstable ankle after suffering a fracture injury.
  • In order to avoid the risk of falling down or re-injuring yourself, physical therapy can help you restore ankle stability.

What To Do After An Ankle Fracture With Exercise – [ ]

The result was a fall that resulted in an ankle twist, which resulted in your foot swelling like a balloon. You discover that you have an ankle fracture and are forced to spend the next 4-6 weeks in a cast. After some time has passed, you see the doctor, who declares that the bone has healed and that you are ready to depart. The cast is removed, but it soon becomes apparent that your calf has become shriveled and little in comparison to the other side. Furthermore, it aches to move your foot, your ankle feels weak, and you cannot even put weight on your foot.

What do you do now?!? In this post, we will go over precisely what an ankle fracture is, as well as some terrific exercises that you can do to jump-start your recovery once your cast is off. Find out all you need to know about what to do following an ankle fracture!

What Is An Ankle Fracture?

A fractured ankle, also known as an ankle fracture, is often caused by a break in the distal fibula or tibia bone at the ankle joint, which are the bones that are positioned on the outside and inside of the lower leg, respectively, at the ankle joint. Ankle fractures are most commonly caused by falls that include twisting of the foot, awkward landings, and contact sports injuries, among other things. There are many different types of ankle fractures, ranging from a simple medial or lateral malleolus fracture to an ankle dislocation with a bi/trimalleolar fracture and everything in between.

Learn How To Improve Ankle Mobility After A Fracture!

Perhaps you came across this post because you’ve recently sprained your ankle and are debating whether or not you should seek medical assistance. That is to say, you’ve arrived to the correct location! Because this is such an excellent topic, researchers decided to find out who should and who should not undergo x-rays in order to save money for the health-care system. The Ottawa Ankle Rules came to the following conclusions about ankle x-ray screening questions.

  1. Can you walk four steps (it’s acceptable if you have to limp a little)? NO? –Ask for an X-ray
  2. What is the source of your ankle tenderness/pain? Is it near your medial or lateral malleoli (the little bone bumps on each side of your ankle)? I’m talking about the rear of the bones, specifically. YES? –Ask for an X-ray

In regards to whether or not you may have a bone fracture in your foot.

  1. Having soreness or pain near the base of your fifth metatarsal (a hump on the lateral/outside region of your foot, midway between the heel and the little toe)? YES? –Ask for an X-ray
  2. Tenderness or soreness around the navicular bone (a lump on the medial/inside region of your foot) are you experiencing? YES, HAVE AN X-RAY DONE

READ:DO I NEED AN X-RAY AFTER AN ANKLE SPRAIN?

It’s a pain to be restricted to a cast for 4-6 weeks at a time. However, this does not imply that you should be absolutely inactive. No one is forcing you to lift weights and run on cardio equipment with only one leg, but don’t just sit on your buttocks on the sofa for a month either. Technically, you may continue to do upper-body workouts and even train your second leg if you want to. Furthermore, our kinetic chain, which includes the joints, muscles, and body areas above our foot/ankle, has an impact on our foot/ankle!

It is possible to improve post-operative results by exercising some proximal musculature and joints, such as our knees and hips, for example.

Exercises After An Ankle Fracture: Stay Strong In A Boot!

If you simply train one leg, there is a prevalent fear that you will be lop-sided and produce asymmetries/imbalances in your body. That is just incorrect! If anything, exercising your other leg can result in something known as the crossover effect, which can aid in the preservation of the size and strength of your other leg! This is a very important component of what to do after suffering an ankle fracture.

So I Got My Cast Off After My Ankle Fracture, Now What?

Many people worry that if they only train one leg, they may become lop-sided and produce asymmetries/imbalances in their body. You’re completely wrong! Indeed, exercising your other leg can have a beneficial influence on your other leg’s growth and strength through a phenomenon known as the crossover effect. When it comes to what to do after an ankle fracture, this is an extremely important step to take.

LISTEN:LIVING WELL WITH LYMPHEDEMA

If you have recently fractured or hurt your ankle, we offer the ideal program to help you get back to 100 percent quickly and safely! The FootAnkleRehab Program is a step-by-step program established by a physical therapist that teaches you how to improve the health of your foot and ankle joints.

You will be exposed to a variety of footankle strengthening and stability exercises that are backed by scientific evidence during this three-phase program. This curriculum will prepare the people of this region for everything that life may throw at them! More information may be found HERE.

What To Do After An Ankle Fracture: Range Of Motion Exercises

Ankle fractures that are not difficult are treated with modest range of motion exercises in every direction. This is exactly what your ankle desires and requires. Following are a number of videos that will assist you in getting your ankle working again, including some excellent exercises after an ankle fracture!

Ankle Pumps

For the usual non-complicated ankle fracture, a gradual introduction to range of motion exercises in both directions is exactly what your ankle desires and requires. Following are a number of videos that will assist you in getting your ankle working again, including some excellent exercises after an ankle fracture.

Ankle Alphabets

Exercises for Ankle Fracture Rehabilitation Program As a result of this activity, you will not have the complete range of motion that you used to have immediately after surgery. Don’t let this discourage you! What matters is that compensations are avoided as early as possible. For example, while attempting to conduct active inversion and eversion of the foot/ankle complex, one common compensation we notice is that patients will rotate their hip joint into internal and external rotation. Concentrate on JUST utilizing your foot/ankle joints and avoiding compensating movements up the chain to achieve maximum results.

Ankle Circles

The following is an example of an ankle fracture rehabilitation program. Early on after surgery, your whole range of motion will be significantly reduced if you perform this exercise. Don’t let this deter you. What matters is that compensations are avoided as early as possible in the process. For example, while attempting to conduct active inversion and eversion of the foot/ankle complex, one common compensation we notice is that patients will rotate their hip joint into both internal and exterior rotation.

Never be afraid; movement will come in due course.

Gas Pedals

Exercises for Ankle Fracture Rehabilitation Program

Toe Spreads

The following is an example of an ankle fracture rehabilitation program.

Weight Shifts

Others ankle fractures heal more slowly than others, and some require more time to heal completely. If you have a complex fracture, it may take a long time, maybe even a year, for your ankle to feel completely normal again, just as it was before the accident occurred. You may learn more about the fundamentals of tissue healing by clicking HERE! A good example of this is the ability to support your entire weight via your foot and ankle in a variety of situations while maintaining ankle mobility, strength, balance, and overall stability.

When you initially begin performing exercises following an ankle fracture, you may put some of the principles you’ve learned here into practice.

Seeing a physical therapist may be beneficial if you continue to have substantial limits and discomfort in your ankle after several months of treatment. More information on what to expect in PT may be found by clickinghere.

Rehab Your Ankles To Avoid Injury!

There are 12 steps to the FootAnkle Prehab Program that will guide you through the process of reducing pain and improving footankle function. Your footankle will be strengthened by bulletproofing your entire leg, and your fitness performance and progress will be enhanced as a result of this instruction. More information may be found HERE.

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References

  1. A systematic study on the accuracy of the Ottawa ankle rules to exclude fractures of the ankle and mid-foot. Bachmann LM, Kolb E, Koller MT, Steurer J, ter Riet G. Accuracy of the Ottawa ankle rules to exclude fractures of the ankle and mid-foot. The British Medical Journal, 2003
  2. 326:417.

Disclaimer – The content here is designed for informationeducation purposes only and is not intended for medical advice.

Breaking an ankle is a painful and inconvenient experience that no one wants to wish on anybody, not even their worst enemy. The agony of a fractured ankle, whether caused by a fall, an accident, or a sports injury, may be excruciating, and it can take months or years to fully heal. From our treatment center in downtown Vancouver, we’ve assisted a large number of people in their recovery from ankle injuries. Men under the age of 50 are more likely than women to suffer a broken ankle, with the majority of women in the 50+ age group following suit.

  1. When a traumatic incident occurs that is severe enough to induce a fracture or a break of the ankle, the majority of individuals are aware of it straight quickly.
  2. Whether or not a person has surgery as a result of the incident is determined on the degree of the injury; nevertheless, in any case, physiotherapy will be required to rehabilitate the ankle.
  3. If a person has had surgery to realign the bones in their ankle, they will most likely be placed in a cast and given a walking assistance for the next six to ten weeks, as the damage will not allow them to bear weight for this period.
  4. How to stand up from a seated position, how to get into and out of a car, and how to walk up and down stairs are all things that the physiotherapist will teach the wounded individual.
  5. After that, the patient will begin to attend visits with a physiotherapist in order to begin the recovery process after the operation.

Your first physio appointment: what to expect

A physiotherapist will thoroughly analyze the status of the injury and formulate a treatment plan during the initial consultation. They will look at the following:

  • Gait. After an injury, this is an evaluation of the way a person walks, for example, how much they are limping, and it is used to determine their limits and develop therapy plans to address those restrictions. Scar tissue is a type of connective tissue that forms after a wound heals. The incision, as well as sprains and strains from the injury, will leave a scar (or scars) on the skin of the individual who has undergone surgical intervention. A physiotherapist can administer and teach massage methods to aid in the healing process and the expansion of range of motion in the area around scar tissue. Strength. Ankle strength will be diminished after several weeks of not being put under any pressure or exercising the ankle
  • Consequently, it will be necessary to determine how much weight the ankle can sustain. Pain. Even if the healing process is well underway, there may still be sensations of discomfort while the injury heals over the course of time. If there is shooting pain or discomfort, a physiotherapist will analyze the situation and determine what should be done to alleviate it. The ability to move freely. When an ankle is broken or fractured, the whole range of motion is restricted, and it is critical to re-establish that function in order to return to regular activities.

Related Articles:What Can I Expect From Physiotherapy,Knee,What Runner’s To Eat Before A Workout,What To Expect From Physiotherapy,What To Expect From Physiotherapy, How to Choose a Pair of Running Shoes Preventing Back Pain Is Simple. What Is a Pinched Nerve and How Does It Happen? Following the examination, a physiotherapist will devise an exercise program to help strengthen the muscles and restore the range of motion that has been lost in the joint, both of which are critical in helping an ankle regain its full range of motion.

An exercise program for the knee and hip, which may have been compromised throughout the healing process while the ankle was in a cast, may also be recommended by a physical therapist.

PhysiotherapyImportance of Prescribed Exercises

Additionally, the physiotherapist may work with a patient to improve gait training, weight and resistance exercises, stretching and flexibility, and other aspects of their health and well-being. Furthermore, as previously noted, it is critical that the injured individual be dedicated to executing the prescribed exercises on a regular basis, both at home and between consultations. A fractured ankle or fracture requires physiotherapy to help the patient regain strength and movement following the injury.

The Best Exercises for Broken Ankles

If you have a fractured ankle, these exercises for a broken ankle are an excellent location to begin your rehabilitation process (once your doctor has given the all clear). It’s likely that you’ve been resting in a walking boot or cast for up to 6 weeks, and your ankle will be stiff, uncomfortable, and weak as a result. Recognizing where to begin and how to proceed might assist you in getting back on track with your recovery as soon as feasible. Continue reading for the most effective exercises for a fractured ankle.

The Perfect Ankle Warm Up

A boot or cast will make your ankle feel stiff when you point your toes after several weeks of wearing one or both of them. Prepare your tight ankle before beginning by alternating between pointing your toes and bending your ankle. This is sufficient to loosen up your stiff ankle. After that, go to the exercises listed below (as tolerated). Having trouble determining whether you have a broken or sprained ankle? Find out more about it here.

Range of Motion Exercises

Ankle range of motion will aid in the improvement of both joint and ankle mobility as well as the flexibility of the surrounding tissue (muscle, ligaments, etc.). Begin with a limited range and gradually increase it as you become more comfortable. Never push yourself to do something that makes you uncomfortable.

Seated Calf Stretch

For this one, you’ll need a stretch strap, a belt, or a towel, and a comfy chair to sit on. To begin started, wrap the strap around the ball of your foot several times. Then, as you grip the ends in each hand, straighten your leg to complete the motion. Pull the toes back toward your chest until you feel a significant stretch in the calf, then hold for a count of three seconds. Hold for at least 20 seconds for a total of 2-3 sets.

Seated Ankle Rotation

Take a deep breath and relax in your chair. Extend the leg you wish to stretch by lifting it off the ground. Next, spin your ankle in a circle as if you were painting a huge circle with your toes, and repeat the process.

Rotate in one direction for 5-10 rotations before repeating in the opposite way for 5-10 rotations. If you are still wearing a brace or boot, proceed with caution and begin this activity slowly and gradually. Repeat this 10 times in each direction for a total of 2-3 sets.

Standing Runners Calf Stretch

For balance assistance, place yourself near a chair or a wall. When you are finished, step the damaged ankle’s foot back and position it with its toes facing straight ahead on the floor (see illustration). Maintain the straightness of your rear knee while bending your front knee and shifting your weight forward. You should maintain your back heel on the ground and keep moving until you feel a powerful stretch in the calf muscles between your heel and knee. This workout should only be performed if you have been given the go-ahead to lift weights.

Ankle Plantar Flexion Stretch

You can try this more strenuous stretch for a longer period of time once you have been cleared to bear weight. Standing near a wall or a chair can help you maintain your balance. Lift your foot and lay the top of your foot flat on the floor with your toes pointed straight back. In order to feel a stretch in the shin, bend your opposing knee while you attempt to straighten your ankle even farther. Bringing your toes inward can allow you to get a deeper stretch (toward the middle of your body).

Strengthening Exercises

Begin with unweighted exercises to increase circulation and mobility in your broken ankle while beginning an ankle strengthening regimen for your fracture. Increase the resistance over time and re-incorporate parts of your standing activities, as well as the balancing exercises listed below.

Resisted Plantar Flexion

Place your feet flat on the floor and your legs straight out in front of you. Grab a resistance band and experiment with different levels of resistance to see how it feels. Placing the band around the bottom of your foot, near the ball of your foot, will help to stabilize your foot. After that, press your toes forward as far as is comfortable while pressing down against the band. Hold for one additional second before gently resuming your original posture. Maintain a straight line between the toes and the shin throughout the exercise.

Resisted Ankle Eversion

Grab both ends of the band with your opposite hand and wrap it around the other foot to give yourself some additional leverage. Alternatively, you may make a circle out of the band and wrap it around both feet simultaneously. Then, as you bend the ankle sideways and away from your body, press the outside edge of the foot against the band to keep it in place. While keeping the ankle in a comfortably bent posture in both directions, keep the motion gradual and controlled in both directions. Do not allow your hips to rotate.

Resisted Ankle Inversion

Finally, keep the band ends in the same hand and cross your legs with the banded foot on top of the other legs as you did before. Hold your hand out to the side in order to create medial resistance to the movement (the opposite of the last exercise).

After you’ve pushed the inside of your foot inward as far as you’re comfortable going, carefully return to the beginning position. Maintain hip stability by avoiding rotation. Follow the same pattern for 10-15 repetitions for 2-3 sets.

Seated Toe Taps

Sit in a chair with your feet level on the floor and about hip width apart from one another. Keep your heels firmly planted on the ground while lifting your toes off the ground and toward the ceiling. Before returning to the beginning position, raise your body as high as you feel comfortable. Adding an ankle weight to the toes or pausing for a longer period of time at the top might make it more difficult. To increase the range of motion, you might alternate between raising the heels off the ground and keeping the toes firmly planted on the ground.

Balance and Proprioception Exercises

Foot and ankle injuries damage the mobility, appropriate coordination, and feeling of one’s own position in space (proprioception) of the injured foot or ankle. As a result, balancing exercises are usually a necessary first step. Begin with these easy exercises and work your way up to doing them on a balancing foam pad or with your eyes closed as time goes on. When performing balancing exercises, always use additional caution to avoid falling.

Single Leg Stance

To keep your equilibrium, stand near a chair or a wall. It’s as simple as shifting your weight into one leg and lifting the other. If at all feasible, maintain your balance on one leg without the aid of others. If necessary, apply a gentle contact with your hand or finger to maintain equilibrium. Concentrating your eyes on a single point can also be beneficial when getting started. Increase the difficulty of this exercise as needed by standing on a soft surface or shifting your head while accomplishing the task at hand.

Tandem Stance

Maintain a parallel position with the feet, which means the toes of one foot should be contacting the heel of the other foot. It’s possible that one foot is easier to keep in front of the other than the other, so remember to alternate. Once you’re in place, all you have to worry about is keeping balanced. If it’s too difficult, spread the feet a few inches apart. Hold for at least 30 seconds for a total of 2-4 sets.

Alternating Side Step

With your feet hip width apart, choose a comfortable spot where you can balance near a chair, counter, or wall and maintain your balance. Take a step to one side with one foot as far as you possibly can before returning to your original standing posture with the other foot. Side-stepping should be done alternately. To make it more difficult, try standing on a softer surface or bending the stationary leg to transform it into a side lunge while still standing. Repeat 10-15 times on each leg for a total of 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions.

Wobble Board

The awobble board is a terrific upper-level lower-leg and body workout and balancing tool for people of all ages. It aids in the development of ankle coordination and core strength for use in everyday activities and sports. Stepping on the board with one foot in the center or two feet balanced on either side of the board are both acceptable options. Once you’re on the board, you may just concentrate on maintaining balance in the middle, or you can practice moving the board such that it touches the ground at precise spots.

After an ankle injury, everything is OK. Always ensure that you are in a secure position with access to assistance if necessary to avoid falling.

Wobble Cushion

It is a terrific upper-level lower-leg and body training and balance tool, as well as a great way to improve balance. It aids with the development of ankle coordination and core strength for use in daily activities and athletic competition. Stepping on the board with one foot in the center or two feet balanced on either side of the board are both acceptable positions for stepping. On the board, you may simply concentrate on maintaining balance in the middle or you can practice moving the board in order to make particular contacts with the floor.

Preventing falls begins by always being in a secure position and seeking assistance if necessary.

Benefits of Ankle Exercises

Even if your ankle fracture was moderate in severity, beginning exercise as soon as possible can help you get back to your favorite everyday activities without experiencing pain or stiffness as quickly as feasible. Among the numerous other advantages of physical activity are the following:

  • Increased strength and coordination for everyday activities
  • Increased range of motion in the ankle joint
  • Decreased risk of future ankle injuries
  • Improved pain management Improved overall quality of life
  • The use of this product as an adjuvant to other ankle injury treatment alternatives is highly recommended.

Other Treatments for Broken Ankles that Provide Pain Relief

Exercise Tips

Getting back into shape after a fracture can be a frustrating process that leaves you unsure of how to go with your rehabilitation. Some pointers for getting the most out of your exercises are as follows:

  • Wait for your doctor’s approval before beginning any form of physical activity. Always use your symptoms as a guide when determining whether to adjust and progress your workout regimen. If necessary, massage, heat, or ice should be used to warm up your ankle before exercising. If you have ankle instability, you may want to consider wearing abraceor supportive shoes. If you are unsure of where to begin, physical therapy can assist you in achieving the best possible outcome. A physical therapist can design a customized home rehabilitation program for you.

Additional Ankle Injury Recoveries Suggestions

Keeping the Ankle Protected During Exercise

Getting back into shape after a shattered ankle involves a precise mix of action and rest. It is not recommended to begin exercising until the broken ankle has fixed itself as a result of healing and enough rest. Begin by taking it gradually and following the advice of your doctor or physical therapist. Seek medical help from your healthcare practitioner if your symptoms suddenly worsen or don’t improve after a period of time. Ankle Products are a good source of information.

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